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Oct 20, 2012

[Mr. Daiki Nakashita] Candid Voices of People Living for Their Life in Fukushima


Although I tried to choose some of all voices, I could not decide which to choose after reading all.  I’d like to introduce all voices.
Masatoshi Takeshita 



English translation of a Japanese article: Daiki Nakashita’s Blog – October 4, 2012 –


I’m sending out tweets about candid voices of people living for their life in Fukushima, whose permission I’ve gotten.  I’d like to introduce their voices on my blog, too.

I’m sending out tweets about candid voices of people living for their life in Fukushima whose permission I’ve gotten.
I’ll post the voices which have received a great response, on my blog, too.
Please read them if you like.

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Female in her eighties living in temporary housing, Fukushima City
“Decontamination is practically the same as the situation in our young days (during the war) when we were forced to cry out diabolical cruelties against all Americans and English with bamboo spears.  Everybody knows that the government’s response is superficial and useless.  However, if we voice it, we are criticized. It is peer pressure; we are forced to conform to group norms.”


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Male in his sixties in Minamisoma City
Takenaka Corporation, building contractor, receives a request for house decontamination at a cost of 5.6 million yen.  On-site subcontractors carry out the decontamination operations with 0.7 million yen after a lot of rake-off is paid to the corporation.  An end subcontractor worker is paid approximately eight thousand yen a day.
Subcontractor workers do sloppy work because they fall out of work after finishing decontamination.  Thus, ensuring job security achieves business turnaround.  This is the reality of decontamination business.


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Male in his sixties living in temporary housing, Iwaki City
“I have worked at a nuclear plant for thirty years, but I cannot work now because I was exposed to radiation.  People escape from reality if they are faced with bitter reality.  I deliberately avoid thinking about future.  I amuse myself by attempting to sing karaoke while drinking sake.  I myself feel miserable, thinking of what I’m doing at my age.


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Male in his sixties, living in temporary housing, Iwaki City
“Do you ask how we could stop nuclear power generation?  It’s simple.  Unless another nuclear power plant explodes and land is too contaminated for people to live, it is impossible to stop operation of nuclear plants.  It is another problem that U.S., business circles and bureaucrats put pressure upon politiciasn.”


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Mr. A in his seventies living in temporary housing (from Ookuma-machi)
We approved of building nuclear power plants to live a stable life without going away to work during the winter time and to live at the same place with my children and grandchildren.  I approved of building nuclear power plants for affluent life and stable growth, and continued to work in a power plant.  I can’t believe what dropped in my lap unexpectedly.

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Male in his seventies living in temporary housing, Iwaki City
“There are sufferers and sufferers.  Situations differ.  People who lost families and those who families survive; people who lost jobs and those who have jobs; people whose houses were swept away and those who have houses; people who have places they can return to and those who don’t; people who have money and those who have no money.  There is one thing I’m sure of, that disparities which existed before the earthquake have got revealed now.”


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Female in her fifties in Minamisoma City
Recently I often think that human beings are more terrifying than radiation.  I feel that in some places of Fukushima prevails an atmosphere in which the mere talk about radiation makes people face peer pressure.  There are many people who intentionally desperately refuse to think about radiation issue.  It is a sort of brain breeze.  I wonder it is self-protection.”


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Male in his seventies living in temporary housing, Fukushima
“I have long worked in a nuclear power plant, but have had subcontractor workers perform dangerous work.  Although we knew that people from Sanya and Kamagasaki, where day laborers gather, were taken to the plant, we turned blind eyes to it.  Looking back on the accident now, I might be an assailant like TEPCO.”


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Male in his sixties in Nakadori, Fukushima
I was astonished to listen to the radio.  The Fukushima Prefecture Board of Education appealed on radio to children to become strong enough to defeat radiation.  Residents in Nakadori are almost unaware of the fact that they are victims.  Therefore, the Board of Education criticizes people who evacuated from the prefecture.  Few people wear masks now.”


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Female in her twenties in Minamisoma City
“I have never studied about nuclear power plants.  However, it was not until my husband working for a subcontractor of TEPCO was hospitalized after exposure to radiation that I was awakened to reality.  Although I have been exposed to radiation since March 11 last year, I have lived a carefree life, thinking “I am safe because somebody will do something necessary” as if the accident were someone else’s problem.  Finally I have realized that indifference will destroys myself.”


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Female in her forties living in temporary housing, Iwaki City
“In temporary housing a middle-aged man committed suicide.  This might happen to me tomorrow……
However, whatever it takes, I can’t say to children ‘where there is life, there is hope.’  Bright future is absolutely impossible here in Fukushima.  I have never thought how difficult it is to live an ordinary life.”


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Female in her twenties in Minamisoma City
Every time I hear about my female friends who got an abortion, I think it is impossible to have a child.  Although my husband and mother-in-law seem to want a child, I think it is impossible to raise a child in Fukushima.  I am surprised when I measure radiation dose near my home.  Even if I give birth to a child, I won’t let the child play outside.  I’ll feel sorry for the child.”


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Female in her twenties in Minamisoma City
“I have always criticized others such as the country, politics and TEPCO since the nuclear disaster.  However, thinking about myself carefully, I have never been to the polls, never read newspapers, and watch only comedy shows on TV.  Although I live near the nuclear power plants, I have never tried to know something about nuclear power plants.  Now I’m ashamed of myself.


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Male in his sixties (from Ookuma-machi) living in temporary housing, Aizu-Wakamatsu City
“Please, think about our town.  Ookuma is just a country town without employment, money or industries.  The town will get a significant benefit if it invites to set up nuclear power plants there.  How many people could refuse to eat it if the enticing carrot is dangled in front of them?  I think that there are some people who are never influenced by the power of money, but a very small number of people if any.”


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Male in his fifties living in temporary housing, Fukushima
“I went to Sendai.  I saw a lot of home builders from across the country get together in Sendai, which enjoys a reconstruction bubble economy.  I heard a business manager say that he enjoyed making profits.  I don’t want him to say aloud even if he really thinks so.  This is because a significant number of people were killed here in Tohoku district.”


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Male in his fifties living in temporary housing, Fukushima
Two acquaintances of mine have committed suicide for the past several months.  Men are weak if they lose work or family.  They had played a good hand thanks to the titles on a name card, but they had lost everything after 3/11.  I am also unemployed.  There is a salon at a meeting place in temporary housing.  Do you think that a grown man can join it alone?”


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Female in her twenties living in temporary housing, Fukushima
“As I have children, I want to study about radiation exposure and try to participate in lecture meetings in the prefecture as often as possible.  However, great teachers say “Radiation dose is almost zero,” “There is no internal exposure” or “Fukushima is all right.”  I cannot get correct information.  If I voice it, I am criticized more severely.


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Male in his sixties (from Ookuma-machi) living in temporary housing, Aizu
I have already prepared myself fully.  There is no debris disposal site other than the area near the nuclear power plants where nobody can live any longer.  If there is money for decontamination, the government should buy up vacant lots in the neighborhood of the power plants to build a debris disposal plant.  No local residents think that they will be able to return to Ookuma.


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Male in his fifties in Minamisoma City
The way of TEPCO and the government is disgusting.  They never treat us as human beings.  However, I have always depended on TEPCO and the government.  What is the most wrong is my way of living without a spirit of independence.  I have fallen into brain freeze, thinking it is fine if I can enjoy myself now and I can make money all to myself.  I have lived, hushing up a disagreeable affair.”

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